The house that grew – a flash fiction story

The House that grewMolly swept her cred-id over the pad with a show of confidence. The realtor smiled, dropping the seed into her other hand.

‘A wise decision,’ he said.

She closed her hand over the seed and felt its small hardness.

* * *

She trekked three days into the wilderness and set up camp.

At sunset, she planted the seed, watered it from the flask. An incantation? But nothing appropriate came to mind.

She rolled herself in her sleeping-bag.

In the morning, a first green shoot! And in three days, just as promised, the house was there, rooted and grown. The frilled green door stood open in welcome.

Molly stepped inside.

Home, she thought.

The door snapped shut.

 

© TheSupercargo


I wrote this text as my first contribution to the Friday Fictioneers flash fiction forum. The stimulus: a photograph of a Gaudi house in Barcelona. In the illustration I tried to include some of the architectural features of house from the photo as well as the appearance of a meat-eating plant. I like the idea of a house that can be grown from seed, a lot easier than building one from inert matter. But living houses need to feed too.

 

20 thoughts on “The house that grew – a flash fiction story”

  1. Dear John,
    Welcome to Friday Fictioneers. In case you haven’t been forewarned, it’s a habit forming activity.
    I enjoyed your story. Gives new meaning to the term “home grown.”
    Shalom,
    Rochelle

    • Thanks Rochelle.
      It was Björn “brudberg” Rudberg who introduced me. I hope to be able to play fairly regularly and will try to get around some of the other contributors later today. If you ever want to use any pictures from my photoblog as a prompt, I’ll be more than happy to let you.
      Cheers,
      John

  2. Yes, this has all the elements of a great story. A nice thought (and Gaudi houses looks organic) and the sinister twist at the end.

  3. I love it! Very creative idea and well written. All I know is that I would love to have a mansion seed like that. Or would I?

  4. Hi Nees,
    Thanks for your comment. Can I assume “perfect until the end” is American for “perfect all the way to the end” and not “perfect up until a faulty ending” as it would mean in British English?
    🙂

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